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to address what needs to be done in that environment. none of that is done without our dependence and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a
. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to
a tree? a treatment for cancer? fuel for our car? do you see hope for the environment? food, clothing, shelter? we are weyerhaeuser. >> we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back. and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. -- rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> of good election for women in congress. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nation, but then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president won
to conserve their environment, this sa lost world. i see this as kind of an advertisement for trying to preserve those kinds of environments, so we can all live together somehow on the planet. >>> right now, at 6:00, the northeast part of the country has survived back-to-back storms, and now another change is coming. >>> the man who tried to assassinate a member of congress is sentenced to live in prison. >>> part of the city skyline might be about to change. good evening, i'm jim vance. >> and i'm doreen gentzler. first, the so-called fiscal cliff. priority number one, for congress and president obama, making a deal that avoids financial disaster. steve handelsman is on capitol hill with more on this. >> reporter: thanks, doreen. this fight is still all about taxes. here on capitol hill there are
were changing to get out of the environment and see how the war was being reported and get back in and get the story. i was traveling around with different officers. most of my time was spent traveling with general petraeus. to security areas and sitting in meetings with him in kabul. if there was not a lot of concern. that is the story reported over the year. we then fit in the biographical digressions. and what i tried to show and i pulled my dissertation were the variables that were influencing david petraeus' thinking. his social networks and his mentors. there are four mentors. holly has been a wonderful source of information. the second is keith running deal. he was -- nightingale. he helped to start the joint special operations trinity concentrate he had been involved in the hostage rescue. their letters show how he was thinking about special operations and that community which not all of people know he has that background and interest in. albeit a sort of academic interest. the third key mentor and most influential is general jack galvin. he was assigned with gen. galvin
analysis in both hard copy, open source, classified, and the cyber environment, to inform these said policy-makers and defenders of the cyber threat. there are four big players -- dhs, responsible for the u.s. infrastructure in terms of how we are protecting our homeland. the fbi does have the law enforcement peace. those here this morning and know exactly why they have that. nsa, also known as cyber command, has the cyber command to drive the entire structure and the policies by which we are going to deploy various networks around the world. cia doesn't do that work but we can't do our work without collaborating am working with each of them. despite the fact that sometimes the matter what the news says, you do not do this alone. we do it with all our partners in the public and private sector. cia does partner with our agencies. we do, i heard a lot about for each of you, you talked about co-ops, internships, opportunities. the partner with these agencies to leverage our own employees and prospective employees to get the best match for the person. we are investing in the future and the futu
have enough studies done to show our impact on the environment. i can share some of those with you if you'd like. but also our reduction of congestion, reduction of need for parking. supervisor wiener has some excellent legislation that is going to come up once it's done that will help expand access to parking, which is very, very much needed that will also help, quite frankly, build less parking and reduce congestion in the city. >> thank you. >> next speaker. >>> good afternoon, eduardo [speaker not understood]. i own a smartcar that i use to get around in eureka valley. it is a good service that enables individual car owners to share the car when they're not using it, making money in the process, about $200 last month renting my car to a neighbor's friend, people living in the same block. get around provides the insurance and technology to make it very easy to share. and no ownership fees and cars that rent for as low as $3 an hour, 15 a day. the peer-to-peer model can operate in a variety of locations unlike fleet, traditional fleet-based model that are limited to the dense urb
environments. >>> researchers in canada say there's no need to fast before taking blood tests to determine blood cholesterol levels. they found results on patients who did not fast were accurate as long as the doctors knew the hour of the patient's last meal. >>> you're trying to quit smoking? well, there may be an app for that some day. resevers in new zealand say smartphones could be a new tool to help smokers quit. they found smokers who received motivational text messages are more likely to stay away from cigarettes. that's kind of interesting. >>> time now for the question of the morning. >> what word most married couples use to describe their spouse? is it a, understanding, b, stubborn, c, forgetful? >> they don't sound very nice. log on to our facebook fan page. we'd love to hear what you think. we'll have the answer in our 6:00 hour. we're also giving away tickets to "les miserables." all you have to do is answer the question of the day correctly. we'll put your name in a hat and randomly draw a name every day. "les miserables" is at national theater coming up next month. we'll be
-cost printing. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> face-to-face. former arizona congresswoman gabrielle giffords takes a long look at jared loughner, the man who tried to kill her. during loughner's sentencing yesterday giffords' husband mark kelly delivered this message to loughner. you tried to create a world as dark and evil as your own. remember this, you failed. loughner was sentenced yesterday to six consecutive life sentences and 140 years for killing six people in last year's tucson rampage. 13 other people were wounded. kelly at one point criticized politicians, including arizona governor jan brewer, for not doing enough on gun control, saying, quote, as a nation we have repeatedly passed up the opportunity to address this issue. after columbine, after virginia tech, after tucson, and after aurora, we have done nothing. c
this on the eve of an election. again, i'm obviously not positing some huge conspiracy. in our environment, in our hyperpartisan environment, most people in a situation like this seeing any possibility for political advantage would have raced to expose something like this, right? general petraeus was confronted about this two weeks ago, right? two weeks before the election. chose -- ultimately decided to resign but didn't decide to resign at that moment. was there part of the reason he did not decide to resign immediately upon being confronted on this, he knew it would be embarrassing for the administration on the eve of an election? that's a reasonable inference. there's so much we don't know because so many people individually have not spoken publicly about the chain of events and their motivations in terms of keeping quiet at a moment of maximum political volatility. >> just to clarify because i've raised a lot of questions here, my biggest concern isn't what happened at the end. i understand there are a lot of conservatives that are going to be thinking that this was -- >> cover-up. >> benghaz
to the environment than in fact was really occurring. acknowledging those lies, b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to felony obstruction of congress. make no mistake. while the company is guilty, individuals committed these crimes. and we have also unsealed today a 23 count indictment charging b.p.'s two highest ranking supervisors aboard the deep water horizon with manslaughter and violation of the clean water act. the indictment charges the two b.p. well site leaders with negligent and gross negligence on 2010. the red flags indicating that the well was not secure both men failed to take appropriate action to prevent the blow out. a separate indictment was also unsealed today charging a former senior b.p. expect sive with obstruction of a investigation and making false statements to law enforcement officials. the indictment alleges that he on behalf of b.p. intentionally under estimated the amount of oil flowing from the well. he allegedly cherry picked pages from documents, with held other documents al together and lied to congress and others to make this spill appear less catastrophic than it
in this hard-charging be the best environment, it was a take no prisoners attitude, right? >> it was. and we were two really different children. and now that i have two sons of my own and i have seen them come out i see that kids are born differently. they respond to the same type of parenting totally differently. for myself it drove me to perfection. it drove me to demand the most for myself. it drove me to study inhuman hours. i could keep going relept -- relentlessly like you do around here. i could charge harder. but for my sister, when she felt she couldn't perform and she couldn't make my mother happy, and she couldn't achieve the same things she saw me doing it destroyed her. it took a big bite out of her confidence and out of hershey thought she was. -- out of who she thought she was. >> where was your dad in all of this? >> my dad and i are very close and we talk and e-mail every day. he was a small business owner. he was someone who worked all the time. we had a very traditional family where he would go out and earn, and my mother would stay home and take care of us. i talk to my s
with our kids now where we almost want to keep them in a sterile environment, not necessarily the best thing because that is how kids build up immunities, right? >> right. i mean now we are pretty much saying well, maybe it is good to eat a little dirt. >> okay. are you an actual doctor? where did we get this guest? okay. >> mankind survived for many generations doing so and it is only in the last few generations that we've become so clean. >> that's right. >> and i'm interested in the shellfish allergies because my mom had the same problem. she turned like 50. one day, she had crab and never again. >> you develop it late in life. once you developed it, it is there. >> and why would that develop all of a sudden? ican't really tell you that. >> is this anything can you do to -- other than be exposed as a young child. is there anything you can do to prevent allergies? >> i think maybe the answer is that you are constantly he can forked to things so that you keep your level of tolerance up. if you are allergic to an antibiotic, if you have been desensitized to it and then stop taking the
data but comfort is an issue. you want to be comfortable at night. you want to have a bed environment that's appealing to you and that leaves you feeling comfortable and that's a very individual experience. >> reporter: the problem is, she says, you don't know what you don't like until you've tried it and trial and error when it comes to pillows can be costly. market research shows that 620% of americans experience symptoms of insomnia or sleep disorders. companies across america are trying to sell us a perfect night sleep with pills, premium mattress, high-tech pillows, white noise machines, aroma therapy. it's fast become a $20 billion industry. >> when you touch it, you feel it, you just want to lay on it. >> forget the old down pillow feathers. one hotel in d.c. has a pillow menu. >> this is nice behind the comfort. this is number 1. it's very comfortable. has a million and one air beads in it. >> front desk manager devon hingle says that their guests love the menu. >> create comfort and then a low level of customization. >> i actually think that's a great idea. if you are thinkin
's all in various environments. you have water, you have land and they're beautiful and ambient. >> everything in the show is for sale including our ravens' sun diary series and that means some savvy art fans have a chance to take home a little piece of the other ray lewis. in baltimore, i'm kate amara, wbal-tv. >> who knew he could do that. >> really, ray? wow. >> he's great. >> he likes to take pictures of the rays. up next, damaged goods from superstorm sandy will be making their way across the country. what you need look out for. >> how much recent mega-storms have cost you and what b.g.e. is doing to decrease that amount. >> a look at last night's winning lottery numbers. ♪ i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholest
of the ocean. that's a unique environment, but not today. they were in board safely. if you've ever played hoops on board an aircraft carrier or had a basketball game canceled due to intracoastal waterway evening humidity, consider yourself in exclusive company. georgetown basketball got both on friday. the opener doesn't go as planned, but another chance to tip off the season tonight hosting duquesne at the horizon center. in the 1st half nate lubick to otto porter and an off balance shot but no good. hopkins is there. porter left in the 1st half with an eye injury. 2nd half off the duquesne miss markel starts with the rebound, nice left hand finish, 9 points, hoyas by three. later more starks, steal and tip this one ahead to himself, drops it for the freshman d' vauntes smith rivera for the lay-in. georgetown over duquesne 61-35. >>> ben olson d.c. united kicking off the eastern conference final game one at houston against the dynamo, 28th minute no score. nick deleon with the heed pass up the left side to leonard pajoy who tracks it down and in it goes, united out to a surprising 1-0 le
and the baby. and there's nothing more important than a nurturing environment with a coach and some dedicated cheerleaders get you through some of the humps. >> among the new recommendations help -- >>> this weekend, a quarter of the nfl quarterbacks who took the field left with concussions. doctors, trainers and coaches have started paying closer attention to the cumulative brain injuries sustained from concussion and what they mean not just for the pros but for our kids. passionate about staying in the game. football is america's sport. and christian stevenson's 12- year-old son is enamored with it. >> he gets up two hours before practice, he's got his uniform on. he can't walk when he gets off the practice field because they've worked him so hard but he's smiling. >> her experience has been far different. after suffering repeated concussions playing the game he loved, he knew it was time to quit. >> my memory is still kind of off. >> because of growing concerns that some of the damage from repeated concussions doesn't go away, one leading boston researcher proposed very tough guidelines fo
thing and this kind of economic dismal environment. and then there are democrats who say, you've got to raise taxes or we're not going to ever be able to close the gap. you can't close the gap with taxes. you have to close the gap with spending reform, tax reform. you have to look at the whole system. we cannot keep spending like there was no tomorrow. >> we're going to keep talking about this throughout the morning. and christine is knee deep in fiscal cliff, so she'll be sticking around as well and john too. thank you for talking with us. we love having you this morning. we'll take a short back and are back in just a moment. >>> welcome back, everybody, you're watching "starting point," along with senator kay bailey hutchison from texas. who's sticking around. and we also have richard socarides. >> did you write that convention speech? >> i did and i'm not getting enough credit. >> ryan linza is with us as well, he's a washington correspondent for the new yorker. a little warning, i'm having trouble speaking today. it must be all the lack of sleep, but i'll plow through anyway. ele
of moving on, i think it's going to be tough, but i think the president was right that the environment's different. and i think his remarks later today, which are a huge deal in this process, i think will reflect the fact that he sees a different environment, a different possibility. the senate's ready to do a deal. and speaker boehner is a big part of the final solution, and i think he looks like he's ready to do a deal. >> i think just to get you off the hook a little bit, i think one of the keys here is what you didn't anticipate and very few people anticipated was not just that obama would win, but that he would win as decisively as he won and that the republicans would face the setbacks they faced in the senate and that so much of the political environment that's not just the presidential but across the board would be such a repudiation, such a chastening moment for republicans. that's been a big part of why the fever might break because it's broader. >> the senate defeats for me were far more chilling. >> right. >> as a republican. again, we absorbed it the first night. i remembe
environment, and we should not let the republicans say, we can just hide this. i do not want to hear how you hide your views. i want to hear how you change your views. >> when you see the message on how to integrate these ideas that they are part of the issues that affect your lives? >> when we were targeting battleground states, these women were reacting to what voters were reacting to. when we are talking about getting more and women into the pipeline, i want to go back to the big story of this campaign and recruiting and getting more women involved and waking up that independent voter, who is becoming more conscious of these issues but also thinking about running and which party they might align with the reagan -- they might align with. one thing we talked about is the amount of money spent on these campaigns that paralyzes the candidates, because they look at it like, how can i even take that on? part of their job is to be able to help candidates raise that kind of money, communique to independent female voters that will elect them and also be able to teach the tactics of how do we commu
political environment has been an opportunity for lawmakers like republican james sensenbrenner of wisconsin to claim they are the new mainstream view on global warming. do you believe global warming is caused by the activity of human beings? >> partially, but not completely. >> hockenberry: percentage? >> can't predict that. >> hockenberry: 30%, 50%? >> well, i know it's not zero and i know it's not a hundred. i can't tell you what number it is in between. >> hockenberry: if 97% of scientists say it is mostly or significantly caused by human activity, what do you say to that? >> they are entitled to their opinion. but they are going to have to... >> hockenberry: do you think this will ever be settled scientifically if 97% consensus doesn't settle it for you? >> well, i... you know, i think that it's up to the scientists and their supporters to convince the public that this is the right thing to do. and the supporters of that side of the argument in the congress have been a huge flop. >> hockenberry: i visited one of the key democrats on this issue, massachuses senator john kerry. what had h
on the environment. president obama renewed his commitment to "freeing ourselves from foreign oil" in his reelection victory speech last week. energy department data shows u.s. imports of crude had fallen 11% this year and the country is on track to produce the most oil since 1991. the syrian military continues to launch attacks on the border town, sending hundreds of civilians fleeing to neighboring turkey. the new bombings come days after more than 11,000 syrian civilians were forced out during strikes last week, one of the largest refugee flights of this year in conflict to date. speaking in geneva, the head of disaster in crisis management at the international federation of red cross and red crescent societies warned turkey needs major aid to handle the growing number of syrian refugees. >> we have seen a doubling of the camp population since july 2012, and i think as you have seen over the last few days, there has been an increase in the number of syrians moving into turkey. they now recognize the situation is becoming prolonged. the initial thoughts the population might be displaced for shorte
in mind the absence of of this level of manpower and as a worker contributing to the environment of lending itself to the idea that we have been seeing in egypt lately previous practices by the egyptian police, for example the fact that a lot of the police officers have to be on a certain rank and have to be kept on contract securing full time permanent employment status with protection. this is one of the conditions that actually makes it much easier on the superiors and senior members of the security establishment to basically pressure them into taking on questionable activities. if you don't pull the trigger then i went toward contract by the end of this year because you are all on a contract and you are basically not protected. so i would just question the assumption that the securities sector reform is necessarily aimed at, you know, at disempowering the security to say that there are a lot of measures and reforms in the case of egypt the with strength in the status of the conditions and the working conditions and the egyptians. >> i think that when we talk about the securit
was able to imagine myself as superhero. my socioeconomic environment come into the neighborhood bullies, demanding respect from a male peers and other pretty gross and make me feel so nervous. i later became captivated by the vasco player known for defining gravity and dunking writing his opponents face the spirit he dutifully try to imitate them as i'd seen dr. jay perform and dedicate virtually all of my free time to watching them practicing his basketball move. in other words i stop seeing in my basketball career to have what dr. jay had. nevertheless, i never forget about the falcon. it was my favorite flying black superhero. here's where we get into some cultural and ideological work. the idea of a black and white into the air, compelling tension, on an respect made a lasting impact on my imagination. the falcon also operated on the broader social level. that is the image of the falcon gliding across an urban skyline come to symbolize the unprecedented access and upward social mobility of many african-americans that were experiencing -- that african-americans experience in educatio
things, to create a nice environment for them to enjoy and the group that came out to cover this said we expected you to be an a-hole. we expected you to be upset down and backwards with granting access to us. and i went, this is who i am. >> are you a nice guy? >> he's a very nice guy. >> this is not who you see. there's always that busch brother problem. baldwin brother problem. >> don't put me in that group. >> seriously, are you a nice guy who is just misunderstood? >> i have a fiery attitude when i put the helmet on. it's just that mentality of when you go into battle and you're a sports guy, you have to do what it takes to win. sometimes it rubs people the wrong way. especially the fabric of the way everything hases viewed these days has to be so clean, crisp cut and you can't have any blemishes. coach bobby knight is a guy i looked up to, tossing chairs, that's how my dad taught me. >> i love how you drive, first of all. watching this documentary, i was struck by how much you seem to mistrust and not like the media. i don't know if it's just specific in nascar. >> we're nice. >> o
enjoy watching these creatures every year. >> if we don't figure out how to preserve their environment, this is a lost world. i see this as kind of an advertisement for trying to preserve those kinds of environments so we can all live together somehow. on the planet. >> reporter: the government is expected to rule on this permit application early next year. savannah? >> gabe gutierrez, thank you. >>> the brazen new identity theft where imposters live your life. how to protect yourself next. my friend told me about a great new way to get deals. it's called bankamerideals, from bank of america. i choose the cash back deals in my mobile or online banking. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. put in my account. this is cash back on top of other rewards we already get. and best of all, it's free. friends help friends get deals. pass it on. [ male announcer ] introducing bankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. who doesn't like a good deal? red raspberries, and blackberries from the northwest a ric
at capella.edu it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management ♪ atmix of energies.ve the world needs a broader that's why we're supplying natural gas to generate cleaner electricity... that has around 50% fewer co2 emissions than coal. and it's also why, with our partner in brazil, shell is producing ethanol - a biofuel made from renewable sugarcane. >>a minute, mom! let's broaden the world's energy mix. let's go. ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> good morning to you, washington, d.c. it is 40 minutes past the hour. right now 42 degrees. a little later, 52 degrees. it's going to get some thunderstorms over there, is that what i read? oh, clouds and then snun the afternoon. i am so glad to be sharing that. sun in the afternoon. so we're going to talk politics. with the political status quo secured, there's only o
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. i put them in cookies, cereal, salads, and this is my famous cranberry baked brie. mmm, craisins make this so yummy. you double-dipped. i know -- it's so good. that retiring some day is even an option for sean and me. how'd you get comfortable enough to know you could really do it? well, planning, of course. and we got a lot of good advice. a few years ago, your mom and i put some money into a pacific life fixed annuity. it guarantees us an income for the rest of our lives, whether social security is all there or not. hey, hey! ♪ [ laughs ] [ male announcer ] to learn more about a guaranteed lifetime income from pacific life, visit pacificlife.com. extremely dry skin can hold you back. ♪ uncover irresistibly touchable skin. with nivea's first breakthrough 48 hours of moisturizing relief. so you're free to love your skin again. ♪ love it, show it, share it. extended moisture from nivea. nivea. touch and be touched. >>> here's "the play of the day." >> admittedly i am something of a bow
and a number of different things in the environment, and we had no idea. later, like many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself, and, um, got a sense of what it was like to be on the nofdz the plant. there was one evening when i came home from working at rocky flats and turned on the television, and there was a show on nightline that, it was an expose of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that i really had an awareness, i really had an understanding of what was happening at iraqi flats and -- rocky plattes platd how extraordinary the contamination was. it was on that day that i decided to quit my job, and that was the day i decided that i would write a book about it. it took me about ten years of research and writing to pull this story together, and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but it's very heavily footnoted, and everything in the book is factual. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives had been affected by rocky flats. not just residents like me and
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. if he insists that tax rates go up for those making over $250,000, what's, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress and senate? >> first having worked in two white houses i believe a president does have a veto over the press secretary. thank goodness b
the way we govern our country. it is a good, therapeutic way to look in a nonhostile environment as to where we need to go with the country. >> john: the fact it is a nonhostile environment means it won't be covered on most cable news outlets. i'm looking over the roster of speakers. of course you're there as well as james carvel and mary madeline. i guess their merge is a model for this kind of event. you have trent lott and ted strickland, jonathan capehart and another married couple, avalon and hoover. it seems like a really, really inspiring roster of people. so i guess let me ask you why did things turn out the way they did last week on election day? >> you know, first of all, it was close but i think that -- you know, most of the pundits got it right. that is i think the people sense that the economy was getting better while slowly things were kind of turning in the right direction. and i think they were willing to give the president the benefit of the doubt under those circumstances. i also think that the
environment. that's the education secretary, arne duncan, who is very tall, by the way, a former pro basketball player in australia. [laughter] he was there and spoke. this is a group that gets no federal money, alto secretary duncan does make space available in his education department building for tutoring of these kids who really need the help. it's a great organization, and i was happy to help them last night. so, jenna, i hope you missed me. jenna: i did, always. maybe a pick-up game with secretary duncan in the future? maybe? jon: maybe, although i am probably the worst basketball player on the planet. jenna: i'm ready to go, jon.
treach your dollar. ♪ ♪ cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> the election is over and now time to take a much needed vacation. with money tight where can you go to get the most bang for your buck? we'll ask walter reed. they are revealing the best budget trip in the new book, best in travel in 2013. great to have you here. >> thankings for having me . take an affordable trip that is fabulous. >>
high-price, high continue ticket items that expand our capabilities in a combat environment. they cannot be obtained and fall under itar protocol for the u.s. government. so we don't have to worry about them falling into enemy hands. so i think they're just worried about they divulged anything about the equipment and didn't ask for permission and got paid, as well. >> so let me ask you about that part of the equation. because i know we don't pay our military enough. and that's just true. that's just true for what they give for their country. >> very true. >> but the navy s.e.a.l.s, these are a special unit. they have a reputation to uphold. so why go out and take this chance? >> well, as s.e.a.l.s, we would never give any information that would put ours or our comrades at risk, no matter what branch of service they're in. so we know exactly what to say and what not to say. so i think they wanted to make the game as authentic as possible without giving away the farm. they didn't talk about tactics or techniques or procedures. they just showed some pieces of equipment. they di
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> welcome back to "early start." more than two weeks after super storm sandy, thousands of people in new york are still in the dark and cold demanding answers right now. >> much of the anger is directed at the long island power authority or lipa for failing to respond to the big one. lipa is the target of a class-action lawsuit and its chief operating officer is stepping down. deb feriyak has been covering this for us. >> it's ban hot mess is the only way to describe it. you have an organization that basically hires out the power grid to a different contractor and what ended up happening is they basically lost control. they weren't prepared. they knew that the big storm was coming but reports said they didn't make the most basic changes like cutting tree branches so the wires wouldn't have to be taken down. this caused a lot of people to be plunged into darkness during the storm. people on long island are tired of the cold, the dark and the run-around from the power company out her
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